Friday, August 30, 2013

The Passage of Time Captured in Layered Landscape Collages by Fong Qi Wei

Time can be a difficult variable to visually convey in still photography, both the length of time an exposure takes or a series of photos meant to depict the passage of time can be somewhat ambiguous without a written explanation. In his latest series, Time is a dimension, Singapore-based photographer Fong Qi Wei (previously) explores just that idea by shooting landscapes from a stationary position over a 2-4 hour period and then digitally slicing the images to create a layered collage. He shoots at sunset or sunrise to obtain a wide variation in light and then carefully cuts each image to reveal incremental timeframes. He explains: The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image. Similarly, our experience of a scene is more than a snapshot. We often remember a sequence of events rather than a still frame full of details. In this series, I strive to capture both details and also a sequence of time in a single 2 dimensional canvas. I hope it gives you pause and reconsider what you experience versus what you shoot with your next camera phone.

Graft Tableware: Biodegradable Utensils that Look Like Vegetables

For her diploma project at the École cantonale d’art de Lausanne in Switzerland, product designer Qiyun Deng created a beautiful set of utensils and and serving bowls made from bioplastic PLA, a material most often derived from vegetable fats, oils, or starches. Titled Graft, the delicately crafted design of each piece serves as a reminder of the biodegradable materials used to create them: a celery stem becomes a handle for a fork, a stalk of fennel becomes a knife, a slender carrot a spoon. While Graft is just a concept at this point, I imagine these could sell extraordinarily well given the right price. But could you actually bring yourself to toss such a beautifully designed object in the compost bin? Learn more over on Deng’s website.

Perfectly Placed Stencil by ABOVE is Best Viewed at Night

Street artist ABOVE tells me via email that it took nearly seven months of searching around London to find the perfect location for his latest stencil of a breakdancer who appears precariously balanced atop the shadow of a parking sign. The piece is only viewable at night when a street lamp casts a shadow at the precise angle to make the illusion work. Fun!

A Mother & Daughter Lookalike Photo Project by Carra Sykes

Mother + Daughter is an ongoing portrait project by artist Carra Sykes who dresses and poses identically to her mother in various photographs. Sykes was looking for a way to lift her spirits while struggling with a long job hunt and was struck by her mom’s penchant for occasionally raiding her Goodwill donation bags to wear her old clothes. While the photos are not meant to be perfectly identical in composition or form, Sykes says the project has become an interesting study of their relationship and physical traits. You can follow the series over on Flickr. For similar projects check out the work of Irina Werning.

A Retired Chemistry Teacher Merges Art and Science by Sculpting Porcelain Objects Inspired by Molecules

Educator, scientist and artist Bobby Jaber retired from teaching chemistry over 20 years ago and decided to dedicate the next chapter of his life to combining his passions for science and art. To do this he began to mimic some of the most beautifully shaped molecules in existence using porcelain. Jaber says that because he spent so much of his life studying chemistry, the study of change in matter, that ceramics were a perfect extension as they dramatically demonstrate chemical change, especially at the physical level. Filmmaker Dave Altizer filmed this brief documentary about Jaber’s artistic philosophy and how the 76-year-old continues to find meaning and success over 20 years into his artistic career. Make sure you catch the last few seconds.

Lightbulbs Adorned with Sprouting Cityscapes by David Graas

Designer David Graas recently released this great lighting object, a 3D-printed hood depicting a sprouting city that fits on top of an LED bulb. Titled Huddle, the light comes in both a pendant and floor version and is available in his shop.

Revelation: Cut Paper Collages and Illustrations by Christine Kim

And we have another great documentary short today. Meet Toronto-based artist Christine Kim whose recent artwork explores intersections between illustration, cut paper collage, and architecture. The video above is part 10 of an ongoing series of top-notch artist interviews conducted by filmmaker Jesse Brass called Making Art.